SM
Pat   Lutz   was   a   lost   soul   when   she   was   young,   seemingly   traveling   life's   paths   without a   map,   and   struggling   to   find   a   sense   of   self-worth,   a   sense   of   direction.   It   wasn't   until she found her purpose on earth – art - that she began to navigate more smoothly. So,   it's   only   fitting   that   the   59-year   old   artists'   recent   exhibit   at   The   Provident   Bank was   titled   New   Directions. As   she   walks   around The Artists   Playground,   her   art   studio located   in   the   Tannery,   Lutz   guides   her   students   through   suggestions,   questions   and encouragement.   It's   not   her   style   to   dictate   to   her   students.   Rather,   she   considers herself   more   of   a   coach,   helping   them   find   their   own   direction.   If   the   number   of students she teaches is any indication, it's clear that her teaching style is effective. "My   way   of   teaching   has   to   be   around   where   my   students   are,"   she   said   "It   takes years to develop an art." Though   she   teaches   classes   in   fundamentals   and   landscapes,   for   children,   teens   and adults,    she    also    offers    a    more    creative    class    called    Painting    from    the    Heart. Surprisingly, Lutz admits she never thought she was a creative person. "I   didn't   know   I   had   it   in   me,"   she   said,   holding   back   tears.   ''It   was   so   wonderful   to say to myself, 'Now, a sense of purpose.' You have to keep trusting." As   it   turns   out,   Painting   from   the   Heart   was   more   of   a   growth   experience   than   Lutz ever   imagined.   For   someone   who   is   such   a   free   spirit   and   positive   influence   on   others, it's   hard   to   imagine   a   younger   Lutz   being   unsure   of   herself.   Yet,   Lutz   admits   she   had problems   in   school   as   a   child   and   teenager   and   describes   herself   as   an   average student.   She   earned   high   marks   in   art,   but   guidance   counselors   always   told   her   she couldn't become an artist. As   a   young   twenty-something,   Lutz   married   her   first   husband   and   they   had   a   baby   together.   Unfortunately,   her   life   was   not picture   perfect.   Living   on   Plum   Island,   she   felt   isolated,   depressed   and   empty,   something   that   got   progressively   worse   after her   husband   left   her   and   their   son.   But   Lutz   soon   began   a   personal   journey   that   would   eventually   change   her   life   forever. The   turning   point   came   when   her   counselor   told   her,   "If   you   were   happy   before,   you   can   be   happy   again,"   These   words would   provide   Lutz   with   the   faith,   strength   and   courage   to   build   her   self-esteem   and rebuild her life. When   she   was   in   her   mid-twenties,   Lutz   decided   to   go   back   to   school   and   began thinking   positively   about   herself   and   her   life.   Her   new-found   self   esteem   brought   her down   new   paths   she   probably   would   not   have   traveled   had   she   not   felt   better   about herself.   She   began   working   as   a   receptionist   at Anna   Jacques   Hospital.   She   also   began dabbling   in   crafts   and   floral   arrangements.   While   she   enjoyed   the   work   and   the interaction with people, she knew it wasn't enough. "I felt like I wanted to give more," said   Lutz.   "One   of   the   new   paths   also   led   her   to   a   poetry   reading   in   1978   where   she met   her   current   husband,   Chuck.   She   was   immediately   drawn   to   his   sensitive   nature. He   encouraged   her   to   meditate   and   read   books   to   help   her   find   some   direction.Then Lutz   remembered   something   –   as   a   teen,   she   loved   to   draw   and   she   was   always   an A- student   in   art.   "I   showed   Chuck   something   I   drew,   and   the   next   day   he   built   me   an easel,"   she   said.   Within   six   months,   Lutz   had   her   first   art   show.   Finally,   she   had   found   her   purpose   in   life.   Though   she continued   working   at   the   hospital,   Lutz   also   started   renting   a   space   where   she   could   work   on   her   art   every   day.   Still,   she   felt like she wanted to do more with her life. One day, a man stopped by the hospital switchboard to speak with her. He knew she was   an   artist   and   asked   her   if   she'd   be   willing   to   give   him   art   lessons.   I   ended   up   hyperventilating   because   I   was   so   excited," said Lutz. "I was so pleased that he wanted me to teach him." More   people   expressed   an   interest   in   learning   from   Lutz.   She   began   teaching   out   of   her   house,   and   in   the   mid-1980s,   also began   teaching   for   Northern   Essex   Community   College.   Eventually,   her   husband   helped   her   find   a   place   to   teach   at   the Tannery.   Unfortunately,   this   was   also   a   sad   time   for   Lutz.   Her   mother,   who   was   ill,   died   the   same   year   Lutz   opened   her studio.   Money   was   tight   and   life   had   become   stressful,   but   after   Lutz   held   her   first   art   show   at   the   Tannery,   she   attracted more   people. With   60   students,   Lutz   was   able   to   move   to   a   larger   space   at   the Tannery,   and   the   number   of   students   increased. At that point, she decided it was time to leave her job at the hospital. "There   I   was,   a   switchboard   operator   with   no   education,"   she   said   "And   then   I   was   teaching.   It's   like   an   unending   sea   of joy." For   Lutz,   The Artists   Playground   is   so   much   more   than   a   business.   It's   a   place   of   joy, friendship,   comfort   and   growth   –   for   her   and   her   students.   With   an   art   studio,   devoted husband,   son,   two   young   grandchildren   and   many   friends,   Lutz   managed   to   find happiness   and   direction   again.   It   would   certainly   be   difficult   for   her   to   deny   that   her life has a purpose. The   Artists    Playground    is    located    at    the   Tannery    Marketplace,    50   Water    Street, Newburyport.   For   more   information   about   classes   or   upcoming   exhibits,   contact   Pat Lutz at 978-462-5366.
What   we   all   become   as   a   person   is   the   result   of   the   sum   of   our   parts.   This   isn’t   truer   for anyone   more   than   for   Pat   Lutz.   She   is   a   person,   much   like   any   of   you   who   might   be   reading this,   who   has   had   her   joys,   sorrows   and   challenges   in   life.   But,   unlike   many   of   us,   she   meets life,   either   in   a   beautiful   field   or   a   dark   alley   and   her   enchanting   spirit   ends   up   skipping   along with it, hand in hand, with a smile on her face and love in her heart. I   thought   the   words   below,   from   a   Current   article   in   2006,   while   not   necessarily   praising   her artistic or teaching skills, say a lot about the woman, Pat Lutz.
Chuck Lutz, 2013
One of Pat’s ‘Painting from the Heart pictures entitled Queenie.
SM
Pat   Lutz   was   a   lost   soul   when   she   was   young,   seemingly   traveling   without   a   map,   and   struggling   to   find   a   sense   of   self-worth,   a   It   wasn't   until   she   found   her   purpose   on   earth   –   art   -   that   she   more smoothly. So,   it's   only   fitting   that   the   59-year   old   artists'   recent   exhibit   Bank   was   titled   New   Directions.   As   she   walks   around   The   her    art    studio    located    in    the    Tannery,    Lutz    guides    her    suggestions,   questions   and   encouragement.   It's   not   her   style   students.   Rather,   she   considers   herself   more   of   a   coach,   helping   own   direction.   If   the   number   of   students   she   teaches   is   any   that her teaching style is effective. "My   way   of   teaching   has   to   be   around   where   my   students   are,"   years to develop an art." Though   she   teaches   classes   in   fundamentals   and   landscapes,   and   adults,   she   also   offers   a   more   creative   class   called   Painting   Surprisingly, Lutz admits she never thought she was a creative person. "I   didn't   know   I   had   it   in   me,"   she   said,   holding   back   tears.   ''It   to say to myself, 'Now, a sense of purpose.' You have to keep trusting." As   it   turns   out,   Painting   from   the   Heart   was   more   of   a   growth   Lutz   ever   imagined.   For   someone   who   is   such   a   free   spirit   and   on   others,   it's   hard   to   imagine   a   younger   Lutz   being   unsure   admits   she   had   problems   in   school   as   a   child   and   teenager   and   as   an   average   student.   She   earned   high   marks   in   art,   but   guidance   always told her she couldn't become an artist. As   a   young   twenty-something,   Lutz   married   her   first   husband   was    not    picture    perfect.    Living    on    Plum    Island,    she    felt    progressively   worse   after   her   husband   left   her   and   their   son.   eventually   change   her   life   forever. The   turning   point   came   when   you   can   be   happy   again,"   These   words   would   provide   Lutz   esteem and rebuild her life. When   she   was   in   her   mid-twenties,   Lutz   decided   to   go   back   and   her   life.   Her   new-found   self   esteem   brought   her   down   new   not   felt   better   about   herself.   She   began   working   as   a   receptionist   Jacques   Hospital.   She   also   began   dabbling   in   crafts   and   floral   While   she   enjoyed   the   work   and   the   interaction   with   people,   enough.   "I   felt   like   I   wanted   to   give   more,"   said   Lutz.   "One   also   led   her   to   a   poetry   reading   in   1978   where   she   met   her   Chuck.   She   was   immediately   drawn   to   his   sensitive   nature.   He   to    meditate    and    read    books    to    help    her    find    some    direction.Then    remembered   something   –   as   a   teen,   she   loved   to   draw   and   she   A-student   in   art.   "I   showed   Chuck   something   I   drew,   and   the   me   an   easel,"   she   said.   Within   six   months,   Lutz   had   her   first   she    had    found    her    purpose    in    life.    Though    she    continued    hospital,   Lutz   also   started   renting   a   space   where   she   could   every   day.   Still,   she   felt   like   she   wanted   to   do   more   with   her   man   stopped   by   the   hospital   switchboard   to   speak   with   her.   willing   to   give   him   art   lessons.   I   ended   up   hyperventilating   because   that he wanted me to teach him." More   people   expressed   an   interest   in   learning   from   Lutz.   She   1980s,   also   began   teaching   for   Northern   Essex   Community   place   to   teach   at   the   Tannery.   Unfortunately,   this   was   also   a   same   year   Lutz   opened   her   studio.   Money   was   tight   and   life   show   at   the   Tannery,   she   attracted   more   people.   With   60   students,   Tannery,   and   the   number   of   students   increased.   At   that   point,   hospital. "There   I   was,   a   switchboard   operator   with   no   education,"   she   sea of joy." For   Lutz,   The   Artists   Playground   of   joy,   friendship,   comfort   studio,   devoted   husband,   managed   to   find   happiness   for her to deny that her life has a purpose. The Artists   Playground   is   Newburyport.    For    more    contact Pat Lutz at 978-462-5366.
What   we   all   become   as   a   person   is   the   result   for   anyone   more   than   for   Pat   Lutz.   She   is   reading   this,   who   has   had   her   joys,   sorrows   us,   she   meets   life,   either   in   a   beautiful   field   ends   up   skipping   along   with   it,   hand   in   hand,   heart. I   thought   the   words   below,   from   a   Current   praising her artistic or teaching skills, say a lot about the woman, Pat Lutz.